We work with senior leaders from around the world by preparing for the worst, to protect the firms they've worked so hard to build
from terrorism, from war, from crime, and from state-sponsored spying.
 
We also work with them after things go wrong: we support on crisis response at the strategic and tactical level, and work on complex, multi- country criminal investigations.
 
We do this in two ways:

Major incidents of terrorism regularly cause widespread false bomb alerts and threats - as Islamic State have carried out successful attacks in the United Kingdom, so too has the risk of evacuation and police cordon risen significantly. But what does the data say about disruption to companies across the country?


Jake Hernandez

As Islamic State begins to lose territory in the Middle East, they have already stated that their tactics will change: particularly targeting high net worth individuals and businesses. But what does this actually mean to families and organisations, and is it credible?


Laura Hawkes

Recent attacks in the United Kingdom, particularly targeting an Ariana Grande concert in Manchester, have struck at the heart of the country's entertainment industry. What should we expect from security arrangements at major events, and how would society react to them?


James Glancy

Data breaches targeting high profile individuals are becoming more and more regular: coupled with the increase in internet devices at home, the likelihood is also that such breaches are going to become more and more intimate. What lessons can be learnt from journalists and dissidents to help protect our personal information online?


Laura Hawkes

The financial and reputational losses of individual crimes of fraud and malfeasance are increasing: as organisations are deploying more means of detection and prevention, they are not alone. The tools and techniques used by organised criminality and malicious insiders are becoming ever more sophisticated and complex. Is it time to go back to basics?


Simon Davison

A spate of recent high profile robberies, kidnappings and thefts have laid open a gulf between the security arrangements of high net worth individuals and the capabilities and skills of those seeking to do them harm: but how is it even possible to fully secure an increasingly global lifestyle in the digital age?


James Glancy

Child trafficking and exploitation is rapidly becoming the first true globalised crime - utilising covert networks, advanced technologies, crowd-distributed content and long supply chains it is becoming increasingly difficult to combat effectively without globalising the response. Taking this kind of crime head-on is a true test for law enforcement agencies, but what do we have to do to pass?


Ana Vigil Haro

Recent events in Turkey have demonstrated three things: a split military which does not have enough control to take the country, a president that does not have enough control to prevent a coup, and a world which does not have enough control to understand and interpret the volumes of 'fact' and 'opinion' created by such a shock. So what next?


Jake Hernandez

Governments invest huge amounts of money in security training and capacity building. But it’s our contention that a lot of that money is being spent inefficiently.


Jake Hernandez

It’s easy to think of strategic security as a sunk cost – necessary expenditure it may be, but a recoupable value-add to the business, it would often appear not.


James Glancy

 
We've been featured in:
The Guardian
 
Thought

An invisible risk: UK bomb threats & cordons
 

Major incidents of terrorism regularly cause widespread false bomb alerts and threats - as Islamic State have carried out successful attacks in the United Kingdom, so too has the risk of evacuation and police cordon risen significantly. But what does the data say about disruption to companies across the country?


Jake Hernandez
Consulting Director


 
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